L’Étourdit: 14th July 1972 : Jacques Lacan

by Julia Evans on July 14, 1972

Notes:

Drive and Fantasy: 1994: Pierre Skriabine  : Available here

The Ordinary Topology of Jacques Lacan: 1986: Jeanne Lafont : Available here

Translated into English

(Three translations available & a compilation at 4):

1) Cormac Gallaher’s translation, published at www.LacaninIreland.com and available here. 

Introduction quoted from LacaninIreland.com:

‘Lacan claimed that this last great synthesis of his work had found its inspiration and verification in his weekly case presentations of patients in St. Anne.

The despair of many French readers, these translations are mainly inspired by the commentary of Christian Fierens and is the fruit of 5+ years of reading and discussion, correction and re-correction with a small group of colleagues.’

A)  First of Cormac Gallagher’s translations:

L’étourdit (1972), ‘A Bilingual Presentation of the First Turn’ Summer 2009 or here

This translation was first published: J. Lacan: L’étourdit: The Letter: 41 (2009): p31-80

Cormac Gallagher’s (translator) introductory note to ‘A Bilingual Presentation of the First Turn’:

‘What is presented here is an attempt to render into English a text which many argue is unreadable in French. The translation is intended to be readable, but only at the cost of considerable effort by the reader. It is a literal translation. There may be a value in paraphrasing Lacan but this is not what I have tried to do. Hence the English is frequently tortured Ŕ this even when I have spent several years and gone though innumerable drafts to get it right. The first paragraph is a good example. The insertion of headings from Fierens‟ Lecture was prompted by my experience with La Famille. Students found the headings of its first edition in the Encylopédie a great help. When I was persuaded to lighten the text by removing them they found it very difficult to follow. The facing French text from l’archive de L’Ecole Lacanienne also makes for heaviness. But what we want to provide is an instrument de travail. Fellow workers in the Lacanian field will let us know how to sharpen it up.’

Contents

First turn: The signifier and the absence of sexual relationship: Introduction (p5c [i] )

Chapter 1: Relationship of meaning to sense (p5d-7d)

1. The signifier and the discourses (p5e-6a)

2. A relationship between heteroclite meanings or the delusion of interpretation

3. The relationship between the meaning of the signifier and interpretation (p6a-7a)

4. The universal and the existence of a saying (p7a-e)

Chapter 2: Freud’s saying (p7e-10d)

1. Ab-sense or Freudian practice (8a-c)

2. Mathematical saying and the wall of the impossible (8d-e)

3. A discourse embarrassed by its language (8e-9a)

4. Saying in the roundabout of discourses (9b-d)

Remark 1: Philosophy and Mathematical Language (9 note)

Remark 2: “To say what is there” (9c-10d)

Chapter 3: There is no sexual relationship (10d-14e)

1. The absence of sexual relationship and the two ex-sistences (10d-11d)

2. The absence of sexual relationship and the two universals (11d-12e)

3.  The absence of sexual relationship and the phallus (12d-13e)

4.  From Freud to the phallic function (13e-14e)

Chapter 4. The phallic function and the formulae of sexuation (14e-25d)

1. The first two formulae and the Oedipus complex (14e-17b)

2.  The prejudice of the first two formulae (17c-18c)

Remark: The discourses and their racism (18b-19d)

3. Feminine Sexuality (19d-21e)

4. The third and fourth formulae of sexuation (22a-23c)

5. The notall or the Heteros (23c-24c)

The congruence of the phallic function (24d)

From one turn to the other (24e-25e)

The riddle of the notall (24e-25b)

A logic for the analyst (25c-d)

B)  Second of Cormac Gallagher’s translations dated July 2009:

L’etourdit – First turn or here

FIRST TURN (5)

I RELATIONSHIP OF MEANING TO SENSE

I.1 The signifier and the discourses (6)

I.2 A relationship between heteroclite meanings or the delusion of interpretation.

I.3 The relationship of the meaning of the signifier and interpretation.

I.4 The universal and the existence of a saying.  (7)

II. FREUD’S SAYING (8)

II.1 Ab-sense or Freudian practice

II.2 The mathematical saying and the wall of the impossible

II.3 A discourse embarrassed by its language (9)

II.4 The saying in the roundabout of discourses

Remark 1: Philosophy and mathematical language

Remark 2: ‘To say what is there’

III. THERE IS NO SEXUAL RELATIONSHIP (approx 10)

III.1 The absence of sexual relationship and the two ex-sistences

III.2 The absence of sexual relationship and the two universals

III.3 The absence of sexual relationship and the phallus

III.4 From Freud to the phallic function

IV. THE PHALLIC FUNCTION AND THE FORMULAE OF SEXUATION

IV 1 The first two formulae and the Oedipus complex

IV.2 The prejudice of the first two formulae

Remark: The discourses and their racism

IV 3 Feminine sexuality

IV 4 The third and fourth formula of sexuation

IV. 5 The notall or the Heteros

The congruence of the phallic function

FROM ONE TURN TO THE OTHER

The riddle of the notall

A logic for the analyst

C)  Third of Cormac Gallagher’s translations – 1st May 2010

L’etourdit – Second turn or here

SECOND TURN: THE DISCOURSE OF THE ANALYST AND INTERPRETATION

The notall touched on by the philosopher (25d)

CHAPTER 1: THE TEACHING OF TOPOLOGY

1. The topology of surfaces (26a-28b)

2. The matheme and the questioning of being (28c-29d)

3. The matheme, topological and heterogeneous subversion (29d- 31a)

CHAPTER 2: THE DISCOURSE OF THE ANALYST

1. The psychoanalytic group is impossible (31a-32c)

2. The thread of psychoanalytic discourse. (32d-34c)

3. Standardisation or activation of the unconscious (34d)

4. The real and the o-object (35c-36c)

CHAPTER 3: SENSE AND STRUCTURE

1. Sense and teaching

2. Structure (40-41)

3. The modification of the structure (41e-43e)

4. The end of analysis (43e-44d)

CHAPTER 4: INTERPRETATION

CONCLUSION

2)  Jack Stone’s translation available here.

Or here

There are extensive notes with this translation.

Note 1 is: ‘This title is a coinage derived the substantive form of the adjective étourdi: dazed, or scatterbrained. The added final “t” allows us to read it as le tour dit: the said turn, or turn said.’

Notice

7th December 2018 : To request a copy of any text whose weblink does not work, contact Julia Evans: je.lacanian@icloud.com : For fuller details, see Notice : Availability of texts from LacanianWorks by Julia Evans or hereand see below.

 

3) Translation of 3 excerpts from Lacan’s text in Alan Sokal & Jean Bricmont ‘Intellectual Impostures: Postmodern Philosophers’ Abuse of Science’, London: Profile Books: p20 & p29-30

4) Jack W. Stone’s, Anthony Chadwick’s & Cormac Gallagher’s translations are all on Richard G. Klein’s website, www.Freud2Lacan.com, and available here

Richard G. Klein notes that in the Scilicet 4 version of L’etourdit, there is a discrepancy in the use of logical formulae & in the Autres écritsversion several symbols are non-standard.

Published in French:

4) J. Lacan, L’étourdit, Scilicet 4 (1973) pp. 5-25

5) J. Lacan, L’étourdit p474 of Autres Écrits: 2001 : Jacques Lacan or here


[i] Page numbers refer to: J. Lacan, L’étourdit, Scilicet 4 (1973) pp. 5-25

Quotations

p26 of Jack W. Stone’s translation in  The Urgency of Mourning : 28th March 2019 : Michele Laboureur or here

 

7th December 2018 : To request a copy of any text whose weblinkdoes not work, contact Julia Evans: je.lacanian@icloud.com : For fuller details, see Notice : Availability of texts from LacanianWorks by Julia Evans or here

 

Julia Evans

Practicing Lacanian Psychoanalyst in Earl’s Court, London

 

Further posts:

Lacanian Transmission here

Some Lacanian history here

Of the clinic here

Topology here

By Sigmund Freud here

Notes on texts by Sigmund Freud here

By Jacques Lacan here

Notes on texts by Jacques Lacan here

Jacques Lacan in English or here 

Translation Working Group here

Use of power here

 

Écrits : 1966 : Jacques Lacan or here

Autres Écrits: 2001 : Jacques Lacan or here