Three leading professional regulatory bodies create a new competence framework.

by Julia Evans on January 15, 2019

Further texts :

Letter signed by Alliance for Counselling and Psychotherapy, Psychotherapists and Counsellors for Social Responsibility, the Psychotherapy and Counselling Union and the College of Psychoanalysts : Against UK political moves towards Statutory Legislation & locking out the clinics of  all practitioners who do not comply (17th  March 2019) : Information here

Newsletter against the BACP, BPC & UKCP SCoPEd project : Alliance for Counselling & Psychotherapy  on 8th February 2019 or here

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Postscript :

The dream of living with no risks by Gustavo Dessal : 1st December 2018 : The Lacanian review online : here  parallels much more elegantly, this move to risk management which reduces the subject to a manageable item.

Quote :  In losing in an almost definitive manner its political function, the State has become administrator, manager and supervisor of the fabulous risk industry, driven by the alliance between techno-science and capital, a compact that consists in turning fear into an object of consumption, into a justification for obedience and into a good argument for organizing new crusades of salvation.

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This link was circulated to me by a colleague on the 29th November – I have just reached it in the depths of my inbox!  This is my quick response.

Contents

1) The letter to the Guardian

2) Comments on the letter

3) Conclusion

4) Relevant texts

 

1) The letter to the Guardian

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/nov/30/ensuring-a-good-standard-of-therapy

Ensuring a good standard of therapy

The three leading regulatory bodies for the counselling and psychotherapy profession have created a new competence framework as a response to the mental health crisis

30th November 2018

Suzanne Moore is right (We can talk about self-care, but this mental health crisis is political, 26 November) that counselling and psychotherapy is about talking and that “it is better to talk about things rather than not”. Addressing the mental health crisis is one of the most challenging tasks faced by us all and counselling and psychotherapy have an important role to play in providing a solution. As the three leading regulatory bodies for the counselling and psychotherapy profession, representing over 50,000 counsellors and psychotherapists, we take this role very seriously. We have registers accredited by the Professional Standards Authority, accountable to parliament, and have in place robust professional training and conduct procedures.

To ensure that we continue to offer consistent training requirements and practice standards across the three professional bodies, we are mapping and defining common professional competencies for our professions. The Scope of Practice and Education for the counselling and psychotherapy professions (SCoPEd) is a collaborative project being jointly undertaken and will enable us to produce a common, evidence-based competence framework.

We are committed to ensuring that those who need it are able to access quality services that can address their needs. This means that, rather than offering “a bewildering array of approaches”, we want to ensure that a range of evidence-based treatments are made available so that people can access the best treatment according to their needs.
Gary Fereday Chief executive, British Psychoanalytic Council, Hadyn Williams Chief executive, British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, Sarah Niblock Chief executive, UK Council for Psychotherapy

2) Comments on the letter

The reason I did not react to this letter when my colleague asked was I was writing this at the time:

The Context for the APPG’s survey on prescribed drug dependence by Julia Evans on 30th  November 2018 (See here) These are 4 of the criticisms  I develop :

A critique of the APPG’s position as established in this survey

1)  that ‘clients’ who are also unique human beings, can be divided into labelled groups, ‘those who are dependant on prescription drugs’.

2) that the talking therapies can be labelled as a branch of medical practice

3) that dependence on drugs can be separated from dependence functioning within each unique individual’s structure

4) that a systematic procedure can be drawn up for imposition on each unique individual subject by a Government-authorised practitioner (so registered with BACP, UKCP or BPS) using a body of knowledge which is imposed over and above the practitioner’s experience to support a withdrawal from dependence process.

All 4 critiques are relevant to this letter.

Further in Psychotherapy is imposed: Psycho-analysis© works: Psychoanalysis operates by Julia Evans on 15th December 2010 (See here) I stated in 2010,

 

Stop press:

Following the establishment of these three positions in the UK’s regulation battlefield, there is now a fight for complete domination. The winner gets control of the jobs market within the NHS, IAPT (Happiness Factories/see note 7) and work paid for by insurance.

 

It appears that the BPC’s, BACP’s & UKCP’s motivation in attempting to standardise practitioners and treatments, is to control the paid jobs market, so they are the sole suppliers to the Government of safe, risk-free therapists.

In order to achieve this aim of cornering the market, they state :

-We have registers accredited by the Professional Standards Authority, accountable to Parliament, and have in place robust professional training and conduct procedures.

– To ensure that we continue to offer consistent training requirements and practice standards across the three professional bodies, we are mapping and defining common professional competencies for our professions.

– … will enable us to produce a common, evidence-based competence framework.

– We are committed to ensuring that those who need it are able to access quality services that can address their needs

– This means that, rather than offering “a bewildering array of approaches”, we want to ensure that a range of evidence-based treatments are made available so that people can access the best treatment according to their needs.

 

Nowhere do these claims collide with reality – they stand unchallenged.  There follows some quick comments:

The assertion is that having your name on a register and being subjected to robust training and conduct procedures means that they can stamp the practitioner as quality assured and up to standard – just as in a factory.  I submit Dr Shipman and , more recently, NHS Consultant Psychiatrist, Zholia Alemi as two of the public examples where this is not the case. Human beings are not factory processes and cannot be treated as such. Each individual varies.

 

The use of professional competencies to regularise all practices into one. So a group of ‘experts’ sit in a committee room and decide what are essential generic competencies and what are not. Or they give it to a cash starved University to do. This automatically asserts that it is possible to become a superior practitioner because you have THE complete knowledge of the practice and are expert. If you then coral all practitioners into one silo of essential competencies as defined by the experts, then individual differences are ignored. Everyone is the same, as they implement the same competences in all situations.

 

A common framework which is enforced from the top downwards. If you do not fit, then your practice must be rubbish. This is part of the protection racket which is in place. Either you conform to our standards, or you do not get work.

 

Services which address needs returns to the medical model and the Government’s NICE clinical guidelines. In practice, symptoms or needs come one by one in the field known as mental issues. They are unique to each subject. It is one thing to promise to deal with a broken leg effectively, via a standard assessment of need, and another to promise to address their needs as unique human beings. What if what the subject really, really wants to do is commit suicide, do you really address their need and make it better?

 

This closing down of a ‘bewildering array of approaches’ to the one standard controlled by these 3 organisations is a brazen attempt to establish a closed shop which excludes those not paying a registration fee.

 

Unfortunately, successive Governments have become enamoured of these organisations because they want to believe that their subjects’ health & wellbeing can be protected as they have ordered in the Health Professions Order 2001.  This of course saves lots of money, because everyone is awarded standard mental health and happiness and gets jobs.

 

3. Conclusion

I have been writing on this subject since 2005. These fantasies and delusions have been repeated so often, they now turn up in the Guardian, unchallenged, as fact. Taking practice away from practitioners and standardising it, is unethical. But it makes lots of money for the registrants and those sitting at the top, managing the registers.

 

4. Relevant texts

Some Lacanian history : here

The Direction of the Treatment and the Principles of its Power:10th-13th July 1958 : Jacques Lacan or here

‘Founding Act’ 21st June 1964: Jacques Lacan or here

See also Note for the Year Book : 28th February 1971 : Jacques Lacan or here

‘Proposal of 9th October 1967  on the psychoanalyst of the School’: Jacques Lacan   or here

Talk on Teaching : 19th April 1970 : Jacques Lacan or here

‘The Italian Note’ 1973 : Jacques Lacan   or here

On the Experience of the Pass : 3rd November 1973 (Afternoon in Paris) : Jacques Lacan  or here

 

Julia Evans

Practicing Lacanian Psychoanalyst in Earl’s Court, London

 

7th December 2018 : To request a copy of any text whose weblink does not work, contact Julia Evans: je.lacanian@icloud.com : For fuller details, see Notice : Availability of texts from LacanianWorks by Julia Evans or here

Other texts

The Context for the APPG’s survey on prescribed drug dependence by Julia Evans on 30th  November 2018 or here

Opposing the Counsellors and Psychotherapists (Regulation) and Conversion Therapy Bill by Julia Evans 23rd August 2018 or here

Psychoanalysis and the Post-DSM Crisis : 2014 : Éric Laurent or here

Politics, ethics, regulation and the talking therapies : current positions emerging from Parliamentary debate by Julia Evans on 20th November 2013 or here

Psychotherapy is imposed:  Psycho-analysis© works: Psychoanalysis operates’: 15thDecember 2010 : by Julia Evans : See here

Challenges to Government’s principles used to define the care of mental ill-health by Julia Evans on 15thJuly 2010 or here

Why is the Ideology of Evaluation Pernicious? by Jean-Claude Maleval on 14thApril 2010 : See here

Use of power here

Ethics here

Definitions of humanness here  & here

Responses to the UK Government action here

UK Government & Government action here

Lacanian Transmission here

Of the clinic here

Texts on ‘The Symbolic Order in the XXIst Century’ here

Some Lacanian History here

Topology here

By Éric Laurent here

By Jean-Claude Maleval here

By Sigmund Freud here