The logic that haste determines : 17th July 2019 : Henrik Lynggaard

by Henrik Lynggaard on July 17, 2019

A fragment of a phrase of Lacan’s “… the logic that haste determines[1], established the guiding line for my explorations in a cartel working on the theme of Urgency.  Embarking ‘late’ on a formation as an analyst, the signifiers of haste and urgency held pertinent personal resonances.  My work in the cartel followed three paths.  Firstly, situating Lacan’s 1975 phrase (above) in his ongoing questioning of temporality as a logical structure and the temporal dimension at play in analysis.  ‘The logic that haste determines’ is an expression with roots dating back at least some 30 years earlier, to Lacan’s 1945 paper Logical Time and the Assertion of Anticipated Certainty.[2]  In this text the reader encounters the famous prisoners’ dilemma and the coinage of three terms with enduring significance in the Lacanian orientation: ‘the instance of the glance’; ‘the time for understanding’; and ‘the moment for concluding.’ In other words, Lacan presents three modalities of time that correspond in each instance to a particular mode of the subject. To quote from Stevens’ precise reading of the same text: “At the instant of the glance, the subject is impersonal; during the time for comprehending, the subject is taken up in the imaginary of intersubjectivity; and at the moment of concluding, the subject fades away in the haste of the act. This moment is a mode of urgency where the certainty of the act anticipates its subjective verification.”[3]

Lacan’s exploration of temporality in its chronological, logical and subjective modalities, are developed in texts such as On the Subject Who is Finally in Question[4] and the 1966 preface to Function and Field of Language.[5]  In these texts Lacan specifies how haste and precipitation are necessary elements in the constitution of the subject.  In the last published text by Lacan, the Preface to the English Edition of Seminar XI[6]which inspired the theme of the 2019 NLS conference, urgency is viewed as something that presses the parlêtre. Something of the order of the urgency of life.  Working on these texts in the course of the yearlong cartel, opened a new and rather surprising path for me.  In preparing for one of the last meetings I was caught by an urge to use the 20 minutes we usually allocated for each of the cartel members to talk about their work, to speak of my analysis of 12 years duration(one undertaken in the mid-80s and my current on-going one). Such precipitation and compression were not without subjective effects…’reorder(ing) past contingencies by conferring on them the sense of necessities to come’.[7]  The third and final path of the work involved an examination of my own clinical practice, especially how I use or misuse time in work with different patients and the logic at play in such decisions and acts.  A detailed examination of a moment in a treatment where my good intentions served to reinforce an image of the good Samaritan over closely attending to the patient’s speech, was painfully instructive.

[1] Lacan, J., “Joyce the Symptom”, The Lacanian Review, 5, 2018, p.16. : See Joyce the Symptom (Sinthome) : 16th June 1975 : Jacques Lacan or here

[2] Lacan, J., “Logical Time and the Assertion of Anticipated Certainty.” Écrits, Norton, NY/London, 2006, pp. 161-175 : See Logical Time and the Assertion of Anticipated Certainty: A New Sophism : March 1945 : Jacques Lacan or here

[3] Stevens, A. The Two Faces of Urgency. https://www.nlscongress2019.com/new-blog/the-two-faces-of-urgency

[4] Lacan, J., “On the Subject Who is Finally in Question.” Écrits, Norton, NY/London, 2006, pp. 189-196. : See Écrits : 1966 : Jacques Lacan or here

[5] Lacan, J., “The Function and Field of Speech and Language in Psychoanalysis.”Écrits, Norton, NY/London, 2006, pp. 197-268. : See The Function and Field of Speech and Language in Psychoanalysis (Rome) : 26th September 1953 : Jacques Lacan  or here

[6] Lacan, J., “Preface to the English Edition of Seminar XI”, The Lacanian Review, 6, 2018, pp. 23-26. : See Preface to the English-language edition of Seminar XI : 17th May 1976 : Jacques Lacan  or here

[7] Lacan, J., “The Function and Field of Speech and Language in Psychoanalysis.”Écrits, Norton, NY/London, 2006, p. 213. See The Function and Field of Speech and Language in Psychoanalysis (Rome) : 26th September 1953 : Jacques Lacan  or here

 

Notes

A previous version of this text was presented at the final meeting of the New Lacanian School‘s cartel on ‘Trauma & Urgent’ on Wednesday 17th July 2019. Members: Amelia Mangani, Bruno de Florence, Greg Hynds, Henrik Lynggaard  & Owen Hewitson +1: Julia Evans 

 

7th December 2018 : To request a copy of any text whose weblink does not work, contact Julia Evans: je.lacanian@icloud.com : For fuller details, see Notice : Availability of texts from LacanianWorks by Julia Evans or here

 

 Further posts:

Some Lacanian history here

Of the clinic here

Trauma here

Groups & Cartels here

Lacanian Transmission here

Use of power here

By Henrik Lynggaard here

By Sigmund Freud here

Notes on texts by Sigmund Freud here

By Jacques Lacan here

Notes on texts by Jacques Lacan here