Extravagance, perverseness, manneristic behaviour and schizophrenia : 1956 : Ludwig Binswanger

by Julia Evans on January 1, 1956

Originally published as:

Pages 188-197 of ‘Drei Formen Missglückten Daseins: Verstiegenheit, Verschrobenheit, Manieriertheit’ : Published Tübingen : M. Niemeyer : 1956

Translation into English of Pages 188-197

Extravagance, perverseness, manneristic behaviour and schizophrenia : 1956 : Ludwig Binswanger

Available here

P83-88 of The Clinical Roots of the Schizophrenia Concept : 28th November 1986 : John Cutting & Michael Shepherd (Editors & Authors) :

Information here

Ludwig Binswanger (1881-1966)

Quoted from ‘The Clinical Roots of the Schizophrenia Concept’

Ludwig Binswanger was born in Kreuzlingen in Switzerland. His father was a psychiatrist and his uncle was Otto Binswanger, whose name is associated with ‘Binswanger’s disease’, a variety of multi-infarct dementia. He studied under Bleuler and Jung, but the main influences on his psychiatric thinking were philosophical, particularly the work of the existential philosophers, Heidegger and Husserl.

Binswanger’s principal claim to attention is his attempt to interpret schizophrenia in terms of existential philosophy. Some of the trends in British psychiatry in the late 1950s and 1960s owe much to Binswanger’s ideas, a point which is brought out if one scans the references in R. D. Laing’s ‘The Divided Self’ . The following extract illustrates Binswanger’s attempts to place the classical symptoms of schizophrenia within an existential framework.

Further texts

By Ludwig Binswanger here

By John Cutting here

By Michael Shepherd here

By Jacques Lacan here

Case studies here

Of the clinic here

Lacanian History here