The case, from unease to the lie : 2002 : Éric Laurent

by Julia Evans on February 1, 2002

The text ‘Le cas, du malaise au mensonge’ was published in French in the revue La Cause Freudienne, No. 50, February 2002, pp. 27 – 37

In English

Translated by Michele Julien

Published at: New Lacanian School’s messager (See here) : as [nls-messager] 17 – 2010/2011 Towards London 2 : on 20th December 2010 : Available here

Republished in Psychoanalytical Notebooks, Number 22 – Lacanian Practice, 2011

Available here

Headings

The Evolution of the Freudian Model

From History to Logic

Giving Proof

From Unease to the Lie of the Case

The Case and the “State of the Thing”

Reference to Sigmund Freud

The Interpretation of Dreams: 1st November 1899 (published as 1900): Sigmund Freud : See here

Wolf Man :From the History of an Infantile Neurosis (The ‘Wolf Man’): 1914] published1918b] : Sigmund Freud : Standard Edition: Vol 17 (SE XVII): p3 or Penguin Freud Library (PFL) : Vol 9: p225

Little Hans : Analysis of a Phobia in a Five-year-old Boy – ‘Little Hans’: 1909 : Sigmund Freud

Schreber : Case of President Schreber : Psychoanalytic notes on an autobiographical account of a case of paranoia (Dementia Paranoides) :1910 (published 1911c) : Sigmund Freud : See Case history of Schreber: 1910: Sigmund Freud or here

Dora : Fragment of an analysis of a case of hysteria (‘Dora’) : 1901 : Sigmund Freud

The Young Homosexual Woman : The Psychogenesis of a case of Homosexuality in a Woman: 1920: Sigmund Freud or here

The Project for a Scientific Psychology: 23rd & 25th September & 5th October 1895: Sigmund Freud : See here

Rat Man : Notes upon a case of Obsessional Neurosis (The ‘Rat Man’) :1909d: Sigmund Freud : Standard Edition: Vol 10: p155 or Penguin Freud Library (PFL) : Vol 9 : p31

Reference to Jacques Lacan

The Italian Note’ : 1973 : Jacques Lacan : See here : also in Autres Écrits: 2001 : Jacques Lacan : See here

– ‘but he turns it round to the French perspective of “concrete psychology”’ : Footnote 4. Lacan J. De la psychose paranoïaque dans ses rapports avec la personnalité (1932), Paris, Seuil, 1975, p. 346. : Published at www.psychaanalyse.com : here :

or available here :

Some translations here though it does not appear that this phrase is included : See The Case of Aimée, or Self-punitive Paranoia: 1932: Jacques Lacan

Quote from P346 : II. Conclusions dogmatiques. : i. La clef du problème nosologique, pronostique et thérapeutique de la psychose paranoïaque doit être cherchée dans une analyse psychologique concrète, qui s’applique à tout le développement de la personnalité du sujet, c’est-à-dire aux événements de son histoire, aux progrès de sa conscience, à ses réactions dans le milieu social.

La méthode implique donc à sa base des monographies psychopathologiques, aussi exhaustives que possible.

– ‘“a dramatic plenitude of the subject-to-subject relation, at the heart of its objective consequences in scientific terms; this dramatic plenitude unfolds in a quest that goes beyond the reality of behaviour, namely to the truth that is constituted in it”’ : Footnote 5. Lacan J, «Prémisses à tout développement possible de la criminologie» (1950), Autres écrits, Paris, Seuil, 2001, p. 121. : This appears not to have been translated to English : In French, see

Published at aejcpp.free.fr here

or here

or Autres Écrits: 2001 : Jacques Lacan : See here

This intervention was made at the same conference : A Theoretical Introduction to the Functions of Psychoanalysis in Criminology (Paris?) : 29th May 1950 : Jacques Lacan : See here

– ‘with coherence at the formal level at which the symptom is established. We will find again an echo of this method in the emphasis placed on the role of the recuperation by each subject of his history’ : Footnote 
6. Lacan J., «Fonction et champ de la parole et du langage» (1953), Écrits. Paris, Seuil, 1966, p. 261.: The Function and Field of Speech and Language in Psychoanalysis (Rome) : 26th September 1953 : Jacques Lacan or here : Probably p48 of Alan Sheridan’s translation : It is certainly this assumption of his history by the subject, in so far as it is constituted by the speech addressed to the other, that constitutes the ground of the new method that Freud called psychoanalysis, not in 1904 – as was taught until recently by an authority who, when he finally threw off the cloak of prudent silence, appeared on that day to know nothing of Freud except the titles of his works- but in 1895. (Probably The Project for a Scientific Psychology: 23rd & 25th September & 5th October 1895: Sigmund Freud : See here)

– ‘In the Rat Man, he emphasises the “general combinatory” of the forms of the obsessional labyrinth.’ : Footnote 7. Lacan J. «La direction de la cure et les principes de son pouvoir», Écrits, op. cit., p. 630. : The Direction of the Treatment and the Principles of its Power:10th-13th July 1958 : Jacques Lacan : See here :  p53 of Cormac Gallagher’s translation : Undoubtedly, it is not enough to go around in circles in some well-explored area of obsessional neurosis to bring him to this roundabout, or to know the latter in order to bring him to it by a route that will never be the most direct. What is needed here is not simply the plan of a reconstructed labyrinth, or even a batch of plans already drawn up. What is needed above all is to possess the general combinatorial that governs their variety certainly, but which, even more usefully, accounts for the tromp-oeil, or rather shifts of perspective in the labyrinth.

– ‘The place of this participation, of this “forbidden” [interdite] and not accursed part, is first named by Lacan as the place of desire.‘: Footnote 12. Lacan J., «La direction de la cure…» (1958), Écrits, op. cit., p. 633.
 : The Direction of the Treatment and the Principles of its Power:10th-13th July 1958 : Jacques Lacan or here :

Possibly p54 of Cormac Gallagher’s translation : All this moves together in an analysis, though not without localised flaws; nevertheless the great convoy remains.

And so our subject, at the end of his tether, comes to the point of playing on me a rather special three-card trick which reveals the structure of desire.

This is the correct reference – two translations are given, as they are very different : p56-57 of Cormac Gallagher’s translation from unedited tapes : And the woman‘s desire here cedes it to his, by showing him what she does not have.

The usual sort of observation will always make much here of the news of a castrating mother, provided the anamnesis lends itself to it. As it happens, she looms large here.

People think then that everything is finished. But we will have nothing to do with it in the interpretation, where to invoke it would not take us very far, but only bring the patient back to the very point of threading his way between a desire and a contempt for it: assuredly the contempt of his shrewish mother in decrying the too ardent desire whose image his father bequeathed him.

But this would teach him less about it than what his mistress says to him: that in her dream having this phallus did not diminish her desire for it. So that it is her own lack of being that has been touched on.

A lack that is the result of an exodus: her being is always elsewhere. He has killed it off as one might say. Do we say this to justify the difficulty of the desire? It is rather that the desire is for difficulty.

P528-529 of Bruce Fink’s translation : And the woman’s desire yields to his desire here, by showing him what she does not have.

Undiscriminating case studies always make much of any sign of a castrating mother, however small the role the anamnesis gives her. She looms large here, as expected.

People think that their job is then done. But it’s of no value in interpretation, where to invoke it would not have taken us very far, except to bring the patient back to the very point where he wound his way between a desire and contempt for that desire: certainly, his ill-tempered mother’s contempt for that overly ardent desire whose image his father bequeathed him.

But this would have taught him less about it than what his mistress said to him: that having this phallus in her dream didn’t stop her from desiring it. Which is why his own want-to-be was touched. That lack results from an exodus: his being is always elsewhere.

– ‘It is from this perspective that I re-read the “Preface to the English Edition of Seminar XI”. In this text, Lacan has a position that is indeed “radical” with respect to the knowledge of the analyst. He starts from the outside-sense [hors-sens]: “When the space of a lapsus no longer carries any meaning (or interpretation), then only is one sure that one is in the unconscious. One knows. But one has only to be aware of the fact to find oneself outside it. […] All I can do is tell the truth. No, that isn’t so – I have missed it.

There is no truth that, in passing through awareness, does not lie”.

: Footnote 19. Lacan J., ‘Preface to the English edition of Seminar XI’.
 : Preface to the English-language edition of Seminar XI : 17th May 1976 : Jacques Lacan : See here : pvii of Alan Sheridan’s translation :

When the space of a lapsus no longer carries any meaning (or interpretation), then only is one sure that one is in the unconscious. One knows.

But one has only to be aware of the fact to find oneself outside it. There is no friendship there, in that space that supports this unconscious.

All I can do is tell the truth. No, that isn’t so—I have missed it. There is no truth that, in passing through awareness, does not lie.

But one runs after it all the same.

: p3 of Alan Sheridan’s translation : Seminar XI : 15th January 1964 : See Seminar XI: The Four Fundamental Concepts: 1963-1964 : beginning 15th January 1964 : Jacques Lacan or here : For me, this seems all the less likely given that the questions I raise in it are the very same as those that I shall be grappling with here, and which are resuscitated by the fact that here I am, in the present circumstances, still asking that very same question—what is psycho-analysis?

No doubt there are certain ambiguities in all this, and the question—as I pointed out in the article—still has a certain bat-like quality. To examine it in broad daylight is what I proposed to do then and, whatever position I am in, it is what I propose to do today.

The position I refer to has changed, in fact; it is not wholly inside, but whether it is outside is not known.

 

Julia Evans

Practicing Lacanian Psychoanalyst, Earl’s Court, London

 

Other texts

By Éric Laurent here

Of the clinic : here

Lacanian Transmission : here

Some Lacanian History : here

Topology : here

From LW working groups : here

By Sigmund Freud here

Notes on texts by Sigmund Freud : here

By Jacques Lacan here

Notes on texts by Jacques Lacan here